Catcher In Rye Statement Thesis

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While many works of fiction once centered on a hero who more or less "saves the day," Caulfield is an extremely flawed character whose story does not end neatly. The novel follows Caulfield through a three-day escapade in New York City where he hopes to find beauty in the world but ultimately has what some critics call a nervous breakdown.

Because Caulfield is a subjective narrator, readers must create their own interpretations of Holden's statements and stories.

I remember around three o’clock that afternoon I was standing way the hell up on top of Thomsen Hill. Then I thought of giving Jane Gallagher’s mother a buzz.

You could see the whole field from there, and you could see the two teams bashing each other all over the place. (Chapter 1 paragraph 3) Talking Points: He is above interacting with people He prefers watching people, not talking PARAGRAPH 2: Topic Sentence: A second instance of Holden’s isolation is at Penn Station where he goes into the phone booth, but realizes there is nobody to call.

PARAGRAPH 1: Topic Sentence: The first instance of Holden isolating himself is when he is watching the football game from the hill instead of from the stands with other people. I came out of the booth, after about twenty minutes or so. He was making out like he was walking a very straight line, the way kids do, and the whole time he kept singing and humming.

Quotes: Anyway, it was the Saturday of the football game. (Chapter 9 paragraph 1) Talking Points: His hesitation is a result of a judgment on others PARAGRAPH 3: Topic Sentence: Third and finally, Holden lives vicariously through other people as a way to combat his isolation. This family that you could tell just came out of some church were walking right in front of me – a father, a mother, and a little kid about six years old. The novel follows Caulfield through a three-day escapade in New York City where he hopes to find beauty in the world but ultimately has what some critics call a nervous breakdown. Salinger's 1951 novel, "The Catcher in the Rye," is the story of Holden Caulfield, an angst-ridden preparatory school dropout who describes how the "phonies" of the world make him unhappy.Americans had won World War II, families were leaving cities to move to suburbia, and young people's perceptions of the world were shattered as if by an atomic bomb.Students could write an argumentative essay about "The Catcher in the Rye" by analyzing how Caulfield represents the massive changes to America's youth. Salinger's 1951 novel, "The Catcher in the Rye," is the story of Holden Caulfield, an angst-ridden preparatory school dropout who describes how the "phonies" of the world make him unhappy.The Oxford Reference points out that many of Caulfield's obsessions symbolize his hope to preserve the innocence of younger people after he realizes that he has lost his own. The novel follows Caulfield through a three-day escapade in New York City where he hopes to find beauty in the world but ultimately has what some critics call a nervous breakdown.Many critics, including Jonathan Yardley of "The Washington Post," argue that Caulfield is just another whiny, rich kid, and therefore, his story is hard to swallow.Specifically, when Phoebe claims she is not going back to school, he insists, “You have to go back to school” Holden’s desire to rescue Phoebe supports the ultimate example of him being a great rescuer, but failing to rescue himself.Toward the end, when Phoebe asks him what he would like to do with his life, he explains his desire to be a “catcher in the rye” .Roake suggests that educators replace Salinger's novel with a more current story of youthful exploration. Salinger's 1951 novel, "The Catcher in the Rye," is the story of Holden Caulfield, an angst-ridden preparatory school dropout who describes how the "phonies" of the world make him unhappy.Students could write a comparative essay that places "The Catcher in the Rye" among more contemporary works that address similar themes but in new contexts. The novel follows Caulfield through a three-day escapade in New York City where he hopes to find beauty in the world but ultimately has what some critics call a nervous breakdown.

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