Thurgood Marshall Essay

Thurgood Marshall Essay-87
His father, William, worked as a steward at an all-white country club. His grandfather was a slave who gained his freedom by escaping from the South during the Civil War.

His father, William, worked as a steward at an all-white country club. His grandfather was a slave who gained his freedom by escaping from the South during the Civil War.

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Marshall maintains that the framers were individuals who either compromised their own moral beliefs or were obvious hypocrites. Marshall does not believe the United States is an impressive nation because of its Constitution and its founders, but rather it is only recently noble because of those individuals who "suffer[ed], stuggle[d], and sacrifice[d]" (Marshall 304) for freedom and turned the tide of popular opinion.

Marshall's draws his logical conclusions from specific events in U. Marshall views the bicentennial celebration as "oversimplified" and believes it it "overlook[s] the many other events that have been instrumental to our achievement as a nation" (Marshall 303).

Instead, Marshall went to law school at Howard University where he finished first in his class, graduating in 1933.

Working as a Lawyer After graduating and passing the bar exam, Marshall opened a small law practice in Baltimore.

NAACP Marshall began to be known for both his skill as a lawyer and his passion for civil rights. In this case Marshall argued that schools should not be segregated.

He became the chief counsel (main lawyer) for the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). Board of Education Marshall's most famous case came in 1954. At that time there were separate schools for black children and white children.

Becoming a Judge In 1961, Marshall was appointed as a judge on the United States Court of Appeals by President John F. He served there until 1965 when he became the United States Solicitor General.

As Solicitor General he represented the federal government before the Supreme Court.

In 1935, he heard of another student, Donald Murray, who was turned away just like Marshall was.

Marshall took the University of Maryland to court and won the case.

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