William Gilpin Three Essays On The Picturesque

William Gilpin Three Essays On The Picturesque-84
Even Gilpin's descriptions can seem quite vague, concentrating on how scenery conformed to picturesque principles rather than its specific character.In one much-quoted passage, Gilpin takes things to an extreme, suggesting that "a mallet judiciously used" might render the insufficiently ruinous gable of Tintern Abbey more picturesque.the picturesque would be spoilt by admitting a fourth.") Although he came in for criticism, Gilpin had published at exactly the right time.

Even Gilpin's descriptions can seem quite vague, concentrating on how scenery conformed to picturesque principles rather than its specific character.In one much-quoted passage, Gilpin takes things to an extreme, suggesting that "a mallet judiciously used" might render the insufficiently ruinous gable of Tintern Abbey more picturesque.the picturesque would be spoilt by admitting a fourth.") Although he came in for criticism, Gilpin had published at exactly the right time.

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Both texture and composition were important in a "correctly picturesque" scene.

The texture should be "rough", "intricate", "varied" or "broken", without obvious straight lines.

In the same work he criticises John Dyer's description of the view from Grongar Hill for describing a distant object in too much detail.

Such passages were easy pickings for satirists such as Jane Austen, as she demonstrated in Northanger Abbey and many of her other novels and works.

Many of these picturesque tourists were intent on sketching, or at least discussing what they saw in terms of landscape painting.

Gilpin's works were the ideal companions for this new generation of travellers; they were written specifically for that market and never intended as comprehensive travel guides.While there he took as a child pupil the future poet Caroline Anne Bowles.Another pupil was his nephew, the painter William Sawrey Gilpin.Although Gilpin sometimes commented on designed landscapes, for him the picturesque remained essentially a set of rules for depicting nature.It was left to others, most notably Richard Payne Knight, Uvedale Price and Thomas Johnes, to develop Gilpin's ideas into more comprehensive theories of the picturesque and apply these more generally to landscape design and architecture.Some extra help from the artist, perhaps in the form of a carefully placed tree, was usually required.In contrast to other contemporary travel writers, such as Thomas Pennant, Gilpin included little history, and few facts or anecdotes.He was succeeded at Cheam by his son, another William Gilpin.William Gilpin died at Boldre, Hampshire, on 5 April 1804 and was buried there on 13 April.Even more unusually, he expressed ideas about the perception of beauty which were purely aesthetic and often divorced from other qualities of the object viewed, such as morality or utility.After working as curate, Gilpin became master, and from 1755 headmaster, at Cheam School.

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